compoundchem:

mrdavisspeaksout:

allegoryblack:

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

Don’t think this is accurate at all. Took 21 shots my my 21st birthday. Ten straight then 5 mins later 11 more.

I was debating the shots as well. I have taken more than 13 in one night

I feel it’s worth taking the time to clarify some points on the LD50 of these substances - the information is present in the graphic/accompanying article, but seems to be being overlooked.Firstly: the LD50 value is for a dose taken all at once. Secondly, it’s the value at which you’d have a 50% chance of death. Some people could drink more than this and live; conversely, some could drink less than this and die. The figures are also for a person of average weight (75kg), and in reality physical and medical conditions are also factors.For alcohol, this is the calculated value, for the alcohol content specified (40% alcohol, 45ml shots). Personal drinking history, whether or not you’re drinking on an empty stomach, and physical/medical condition can all affect this value.

compoundchem:

mrdavisspeaksout:

allegoryblack:

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!

Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

Don’t think this is accurate at all. Took 21 shots my my 21st birthday. Ten straight then 5 mins later 11 more.

I was debating the shots as well. I have taken more than 13 in one night

I feel it’s worth taking the time to clarify some points on the LD50 of these substances - the information is present in the graphic/accompanying article, but seems to be being overlooked.

Firstly: the LD50 value is for a dose taken all at once. Secondly, it’s the value at which you’d have a 50% chance of death. Some people could drink more than this and live; conversely, some could drink less than this and die. The figures are also for a person of average weight (75kg), and in reality physical and medical conditions are also factors.

For alcohol, this is the calculated value, for the alcohol content specified (40% alcohol, 45ml shots). Personal drinking history, whether or not you’re drinking on an empty stomach, and physical/medical condition can all affect this value.

(Source: carlburton)

ricktimus:

An hour and four minutes in. Fourth time crying.

sunworldstories:

by Chiara Bautista

We are absolutely in love!

hophigh:

YOU GUYS TURN ON THE SUBTITLES

AHH I NEED A MINUTE

(via klutzy-fallen-angel)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

jtotheizzoe:

ted:

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).

These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).

Learn more here »

I’m strongly urchin you to fall in love with echinoderms. Such superb sea symmetry.

(via freshphotons)

Remember: If confronted by a librarian while looking for a book to check out, do not attempt to escape by climbing a tree. There are no trees in the library.