fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

You might find it hard to imagine gravity as a weak force, but consider that a small magnet can hold up a paper clip, even though the entire earth is pulling down on it.

jtotheizzoe:

freshphotons:

Cosmic Inflation Explained.

Here’s PHD Comics with a great explanation of the HUUUUGE physics news this week.

(via edwardspoonhands)

thecraftychemist:

Magnetic induction - the levitating bbq

At the Palais de la Decouverte in Paris, a 1kg aluminium plate is levitated above a large coil of wire that is being supplied with 800A of alternating current at 900Hz.

Note the flare of the globes on the lamp when he moves it into the magnetic field and the steam coming off the surface - it’s also humming with the frequency of the alternating current. If you have time I recommend watching the video - it is very entertaining.

Video source

laboratoryequipment:

Water-Wrinkled Fingers Hold Evolutionary PurposeWrinkly fingers caused by soaking them in water for a long time, such as in the bath or doing the dishes, have been shown to improve our grip on wet objects or objects under water. Scientists at Newcastle Univ. studied people taking objects out of water with wrinkled fingers and again without wrinkled fingers to explain why the effect occurs.Author Tom Smulders, publishing the paper in Biology Letters says, “We have shown that wrinkled fingers give a better grip in wet conditions – it could be working like treads on your car tires which allow more of the tire to be in contact with the road and gives you a better grip. Going back in time this wrinkling of our fingers in wet conditions could have helped with gathering food from wet vegetation or streams. And as we see the effect in our toes too, this may have been an advantage as it may have meant our ancestors were able to get a better footing in the rain.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/water-wrinkled-fingers-hold-evolutionary-purpose

laboratoryequipment:

Water-Wrinkled Fingers Hold Evolutionary Purpose

Wrinkly fingers caused by soaking them in water for a long time, such as in the bath or doing the dishes, have been shown to improve our grip on wet objects or objects under water. Scientists at Newcastle Univ. studied people taking objects out of water with wrinkled fingers and again without wrinkled fingers to explain why the effect occurs.

Author Tom Smulders, publishing the paper in Biology Letters says, “We have shown that wrinkled fingers give a better grip in wet conditions – it could be working like treads on your car tires which allow more of the tire to be in contact with the road and gives you a better grip. Going back in time this wrinkling of our fingers in wet conditions could have helped with gathering food from wet vegetation or streams. And as we see the effect in our toes too, this may have been an advantage as it may have meant our ancestors were able to get a better footing in the rain.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/water-wrinkled-fingers-hold-evolutionary-purpose

14-billion-years-later:

How To Cut a Drop of Water In HalfThis may not sound like a particularly difficult task, but a lot of science has gone in to producing an easier way of doing so. Antonio Garcia of Arizona State University has made “knives” for this task by coating zinc or polyethylene in hydrophobic chemicals such as silver nitrate and a superhydrophobic solution known as HDFT.The implications of being able to cleanly cleave a drop of water is in biomedical research where it could make separating proteins in biological fluids much easier.

14-billion-years-later:

How To Cut a Drop of Water In Half

This may not sound like a particularly difficult task, but a lot of science has gone in to producing an easier way of doing so. Antonio Garcia of Arizona State University has made “knives” for this task by coating zinc or polyethylene in hydrophobic chemicals such as silver nitrate and a superhydrophobic solution known as HDFT.

The implications of being able to cleanly cleave a drop of water is in biomedical research where it could make separating proteins in biological fluids much easier.

(via greatmindsofscience)

jtotheizzoe:

sciencepopularis:

Reddit’s mind-blowing sentences

So, a while back I saw a Reddit thread about mind-blowing sentences and what struck me was how many of the best had foundations in scientific disciplines, from human conciousness to genetics. Seeing these sentences, I couldn’t help but put together a nice album that I knew us Tumblrs would love.

In case the hydrogen one has you stumped, as reddit user ‘Propionate’ put it:

“Really hot plasma, Hydrogen, Big clouds of hydrogen, Big balls of hydrogen, stars, supernova, heavier elements like carbon, clouds of heavier elements, big balls of heavier elements, planets, life, humans”

Everyone should make it a point to think about something like this at least once a day.

(Source: sciencepopularis, via greatmindsofscience)

Physics is becoming too difficult for the physicists.
Remember: If confronted by a librarian while looking for a book to check out, do not attempt to escape by climbing a tree. There are no trees in the library.